logo
Busy Spring..

Busy Spring..

Well as I’m sure you’ve all noticed I’ve been quite silent since my last post, I’ve started a couple, but never finished. But now, after one very busy spring, I’m starting to feel like a human being again, Johan and I finally enjoyed our first day ever in quite sometime where we actually took a day off, a day off the farm, a day of socializing with friends and a day of sleeping in, enjoying breakfast together and getting off farm to enjoy the other joys in life, like hiking, horseback riding and enjoying just sitting on our deck and taking in the beauty that is all around us here at Elaho River Farm. It’s so easy to get sucked into project after project on the farm with no end in sight, and if we’ve learned anything this spring it sure was to step back and take a good long look at what works, what doesn’t, and how to better our efficiency and become a well oiled machine, all in turn to better our clients and get comedown time in-between. After attending some spring workshops, reading up on some great farming books and podcasts we’ve seen where we’ve needed to focus our workload and where we need to lean it up. Some all time favourites this year have also been John Suscovich’s work with Farming Market Solutions, Diego’s work with¬†Permaculture Voices and the two rockstar farmers Jean Martain Fortier and Curtis Stone! They have great podcasts, vlogs, and blog posts, perfect for loading up onto your iPad or device and getting out onto the farm, desk or like and...
Entering into the grass fed chicken world

Entering into the grass fed chicken world

So Johan and I have decided to take on another project in the oh so busy world of farming ūüėČ ¬† ¬†We’re going to try our hand at raising 25 grass fed free range meat birds. After spending the winter researching breeds and hatcheries, and not to mention enjoying listening to John Suscovich’s great¬†podcast¬†all about chicken farming and more, we got the itch to invest and try our hand at not only layers, but now meat birds. Seeing we feel strongly about our flocks having the upmost care and a good healthy upbringing we decided to go with Mistal Gris chicks from¬†True North Farm.¬†Mistral Gris take a little longer to mature but don’t deal with the horrid experience of being a hybrid broiler that grows at such a rate their bones and legs can not contain their own body weight and can end up breaking their legs or become unable to move, plus in staying with our heritage roots they meet the list of not being a hybrid commercial breed. Terra Firma Farms, in Revelstoke BC has a great write up on the Mistral Gris bird and we intend to follow a very similar set up to how we’ll raise our hens We plan to pick them up as chicks at the end of March, raise them in our brooder until they feather out enough to move onto pasture and live in a secured movable coop, just like John’s design here: Chicken Tractors, where they can roam and eat grass as natured intended. Terra Firma Farms, in Revelstoke BC has a great write up on their blog¬†on the Mistral...
Winter Fuzzies

Winter Fuzzies

So it’s December 16th and I’m getting all the fuzzy feelings inside for the holidays, a time when I can set down my work wears, sit back, put my feet up and enjoy some hot coco around the fire.. or can I? Alas it seems life on a farm the work never ceases, however the plus side is in the winter it does slow down, so we intend to take full advantage of this slow period and get to all the many tasks we’ve been putting on the back burner for the past number of months.. Johan’s stacked more wood around the house so we ca easily access the wood to warm our home over the winter months, he’s made some amazing slow feeder boxes for the horses and stream lined our work flow by installing a float system on our horses water tank to keep it fully stoked with fresh clean drinking water all season long, ya hoo! We also decided after the major interest in our farm fresh free range eggs that it might be a good idea to have some more hens on board, so we’ve invested in 12 more laying hens. Seeing we feel strongly about heritage breeds we found a nice little hobby farm who had a mixure of white speckled sussex, an orpington mix, and black australops for sale. And being that theres always learning to be had, especially on the new farmer side of things, it turns out a couple of the hens we brought home had leg mites, darn it, lessons learned to inspect more deeply before bringing new critters home....
Falling back into Autumn

Falling back into Autumn

¬†As things settle down, the rain starts and the leaves change colour, we get ready for the slow fall back of autumn. Theres a certain calmness that comes with autumn, after the busy ramped up summer times soaking up the rays and rocking the gardens, come a stillness, we watch the leaves drop¬†from¬†their branches, the air becomes crisp and sweet, and the ever so vibrant gardens start to settle back down and into the earth for yet another season. It’s a time for reflection and stillness, a time to look back at the year gone by¬†and a time to give yourself a good pat on the back for all you’ve¬†accomplished, or at least that what I like to do.¬†I enjoy the scarves, the layers, cozy sweaters and warming myself by the fire; the hot chocolate, the freshness in the air and those big fuzzy coats the horses start to grow. It’s also a great time to curl up by the crackling fire with a good book and a hot cup of tea, while the pups snooze at your feet, and in so doing I intend to take full use of this time to brush up on my skills and get some good books out from the library. ¬†¬† ¬† I’m hoping to learn¬†up on my pig keeping skills as we’d like to add some berkshire pigs to the farm this coming year, I’m also¬†looking forward¬†to finishing the final details to the tiny home and last but not least¬†getting¬†some time in at the many great farmer conferences that happen¬†in BC during the fall/winter seasons. Stay tuned for more from the...
Summer Progress

Summer Progress

Well to say it was a busy summer would be an understatement at best. Between trying to pull 60-70hr weeks at work (oh the glorious film world), I also came home on my time off and tended to the farm and garden. I wouldn‚Äôt be lying if I said I wished I chose the later for a regular day to day, but the bills needed to be paid and animals needed to be fed ūüėČ The 2-5 year plan is to move full time onto the farm and get a good start happening on the farmstead, growing local organic food for the Squamish community, hosting guests here on the farm in our tiny home B&B, raising free range happy chickens and pigs, and having a couple more horses join our herd. Our mission is to bring the people, the animals, and our food back to their roots, quite literally. Where the animals are free to roam as they so should, food is grown as much to its natural environment as possible and for us to come back to our relationship with the water we use, the food we eat, the power we pull and where our waste goes. Having more of a true relationship in whole, where everyone can come and be a part of it all, and so be immersed in this gorgeous place we call home. We look forward to sharing this dream with those near and far and hope you‚Äôll join us in the not too distant future. In the meantime here‚Äôs some photos of this summer, the animals, gardens, and the tiny home well on...
New Growth..

New Growth..

The gardens are raging in all their glory now, beautiful buds, so much green and even the oh so edible bits! We’ve had the driest, warmest spring the coast has seen in years, and yet a part of me really can’t complain. Feels like the interior these days, however this land¬†and all its greenery are really needing the rains back, no matter how¬†much I curse those rains during¬†the winter months. ¬† Well I’m not going to lie, even though the gardens looking great I’ve never experienced such a bombardment of slugs in all the years I’ve gardened, feeling like survival of the fittest around here. Had to put a barrier up around the raised beds, go out at dusk/periodically throughout the night to find all the slimy critters and get rid of the infestation. So far between the two we’ve managed¬†to bring the numbers down, not without loosing a few starts. Alas such is the farm...